City leaders commit to critical problem solutions

April 17, 2018. WHAS 11.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WHAS11) – It was a crowded auditorium Tuesday night, as hundreds from the organization, CLOUT, offered their solutions for some of Louisville Metro’s most critical problems: affordable housing, mental illness and school safety.

CLOUT, the Citizens of Louisville Organized and United Together asked city leaders like JCPS Superintendent Dr. Marty Pollio to commit to putting restorative practices in 10 more schools by the 2019-20 school year.

CLOUT: Mayor Fischer needs to urge LMPD to improve shooting de-escalation tactics

April 13, 2018. Courier-Journal.
Whenever there is a police shooting in our community there is much back-and-forth commentary and disagreement about whether the shooting could have been avoided. When the victim is a person of color, questions and disagreements become even more acute.

When the health problems of mental illness or addiction are involved, additional questions about avoidability arise. As a community that identifies itself as one of compassion, this topic is one that we must discuss and work on together for improvement, for the sake of our citizens and police officers alike.

Drug court judge seeks emergency fund for participants in treatment program

July 13, 2017. Insider Louisville.

District Court Judge Stephanie Pearce Burke says her speciality drug court in Jefferson County designed to steer criminal defendants toward addiction treatment instead of jail is producing good results, but it’s only at half-capacity and in need of discretionary funds to help participants in crisis pay for housing, medication and food to increase their odds of completing the program.

Earlier this week, Burke participated in the inaugural criminal justice roundtable of city leaders created by Citizens of Louisville Organized and United Together (CLOUT), a faith-based social justice group.

Metro Council approves first $10 million to affordable housing trust fund

June 27, 2017. WLKY.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — After years of pushing for more city funds for affordable housing, the Louisville Metro Council approved its first $10 million to a special fund.In 2008, the Metro Council created the affordable housing trust fund and called for an annual budget of $10 million, but getting that annual funding has been a battle.