Mayor Fischer Won’t Meet Again With Citizen Group To Talk Louisville Police Policies

August 10, 2018. WFPL.

Mayor Greg Fischer’s office has denied a follow-up meeting with a local faith-based group addressing police de-escalation tactics, saying there’s “no need” for a meeting with the mayor or his deputy.

Citizens of Louisville Organized and United Together (CLOUT) met with Mayor Fischer on June 22, alleging the Louisville Metro Police Department doesn’t enforce it’s own de-escalation policies when it interacts with mentally disabled and addicted people.

Tri-County Organizations Launch Partnership to Improve Early Childhood Education and Care in Berkeley County

August 9, 2018. The Charleston Chronicle.

Six Charleston-area organizations, a mental health professional, a doula, and a data expert have come together to form a coalition designed to improve the wellbeing and potential of children affected by adverse circumstances in Berkeley County, South Carolina.

Called the Berkeley Early Education and Care Collective (BEE&CC), the coalition was one of 139 groups that applied to take part in the Networks of Opportunity for Child Wellbeing (NOW) Learning Community program of Boston Medical Center’s Vital Village Network, an initiative funded through a $2.2 million grant by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. BEE&CC was one of ten groups selected across the United States to take part in the program.

Editorial: Mental health center on ballot

July 20, 2018. Lawrence Journal-World.

Douglas County commissioners are right to support a ballot initiative asking voters to approve funding for a behavioral health campus and expanded mental health programming.

The issue, which still must be finalized, will be on the ballot in November. The move follows voters’ rejection in May of a half-cent sales tax proposal that would have funded both an expanded Douglas County Jail as well as the behavioral health campus.

That contentious vote failed in large part due to organized opposition from groups like Justice Matters that supported the mental health campus but were staunchly opposed to the expanded jail. The vote was 53 percent against the ballot issue and 47 percent for it.

Justice Ministry holds first meeting Tuesday to tackle problem of affordable housing

July 10, 2018. Charleston City Paper.

After more than a thousand people showed up to the Charleston Area Justice Ministry’s annual gathering on April 30, the social justice organization will hold the first meeting as it sets out with the goal of establishing a regional housing trust fund on Tues. July 10.

Starting at 3 p.m. at St. Patrick’s Catholic Church (134 St Philip St.), the meeting is one of the first steps the group is taking to help mitigate the difficulties posed by of skyrocketing rent prices throughout the Lowcountry. It will help check off three of the nine goals the 27-member advocacy group set for itself back in April: developing a coalition with members from various regional governments, convening the coalition within 75 days, and meeting with Michael Anderson.

Report: Duval poised to be a state leader in juvenile civil citation use

June 26, 2018. Florida Times-Union.

For years, juvenile justice advocates slammed Duval County for arresting dozens of kids each month who could have avoided court and entanglement in the juvenile justice system altogether if they’d been offered a simple alternative.

But, a new report released Tuesday highlights the upward trend in the last year in that alternative — pre-arrest diversion, also called a civil citation — in the area judicial circuit. The progress followed the signing of a new memorandum of understanding among 22 local agencies, including the State Attorney’s Office of the Fourth Judicial Circuit, the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office and agencies from Clay and Nassau counties. Now, the report says, Duval County could be among the top-performing counties statewide in 2018.