Housing prices still unaffordable for most in Charleston region, burdening workforce

January 26, 2019. The Post and Courier.

Even as more people over the past year have called for action on the affordable housing shortage in the Charleston region, typical rents and home prices remain higher than what most workers can pay.

In late 2017, The Post and Courier analyzed local housing trends and salary data, revealing that much of the workforce couldn’t afford to live where they worked in the center of the region. As a result, teachers, police officers and hospitality workers were moving farther away into the edges of town for cheaper housing — adding more commuters to an already congested roads system.

Hillsborough’s Housing Crunch: Searching For Solutions

December 16, 2018. WUSF News.

Back in October, hundreds of Hillsborough County residents packed the pews of Tampa’s First Seventh Day Adventist Church.

It was an interfaith gathering of congregations, all members of the Hillsborough Organization for Progress and Equality (HOPE). People chatted and a choir led the group in singing hymns, but before too long, they got down to business.

Albemarle takes steps on affordable housing issue

November 18, 2018. The Daily Progress.

A housing fund likely will be included in Albemarle County’s fiscal year 2020 budget.

The county Board of Supervisors last week heard again from community members and members of Interfaith Movement Promoting Action by Congregations Together who want the board to establish a housing fund with annual and consistent funding.

Greta Dershimer, with Thomas Jefferson Memorial Church serves on IMPACT’s affordable housing committee. She said in an interview that IMPACT members are pleased that supervisors agreed to direct county staff to work on the group’s proposals related to affordable housing.

City officials to give updates on addiction, public safety at CLOUT meeting

November 12, 2018. Insider Louisville.

Several city officials are slated to provide updates Monday on a wide range of topics — from school safety to how the police treat individuals with mental illness — that have been raised by one of Louisville’s most prominent interfaith social justice organizations.

On Monday night, members of CLOUT, or Citizens of Louisville Organized and United Together, will hear “progress reports” from several local politicians about targeted “issue campaigns” undertaken by the group, according to a news release.