Charleston needs a qualified, independent police audit

June 18, 2017. The Post and Courier.

What should Charleston do about citizens’ repeated allegations of racial bias by police? Mayor Tecklenburg seemed untroubled by such reports in his May 30th Post & Courier column celebrating the city’s “racial progress.” He praised the police chief for leading the Illumination Project since 2015, a period of “remarkable forward motion for our police department and the community it serves.” He also noted that “an independent, third party bias-based policing audit” had just begun.

Charleston City Council could heed justice ministry’s call to hire new firm to audit police department

May 24, 2017. The Post and Courier.

Members of the Charleston Area Justice Ministry dominated the public comment period at the Charleston City Council meeting Tuesday, as they had during the previous three meetings, to repeat that the city hadn’t hired the right firm to identify racial biases in the Charleston Police Department.

In seven hours, two were dead. What will Lexington do to prevent more bloodshed?

May 23, 2017. Lexington Herald Leader.

Two fatal shootings in Lexington in seven hours on Monday have caused some residents to fear a spike in violent crime, but police say the killings don’t necessarily indicate a brutal summer ahead.

The shootings Monday increased the murder toll to seven in 2017, the same total the city had by the same date in 2016. However, gun violence escalated, and by the end of 2016, Lexington saw 24 murders, the highest total in 15 years.

Leaders of BOLD Justice hold ministry celebration in Hollywood house of worship

May 17, 2017. Hollywood Gazette.

The BOLD Justice (Broward Organized Leaders Doing Justice) recently held its Justice Ministry Celebration at Little Flower Catholic Church. Community activists and faith group leaders representing a wide variety of religious organizations joined together to celebrate their accomplishments and discuss their goals for the upcoming year. Throughout the night people shouted out, “We are Bold.”

More kids in trouble will be eligible for second chances under new civil citation policy

May 10, 2017. Florida Times-Union.

Wednesday afternoon marked a “historic” time for juvenile justice in Northeast Florida as State Attorney Melissa Nelson fulfilled a campaign promise long-awaited by reform-minded advocates.

The use of civil citations, an alternative to arrest for juvenile misdemeanor offenders, is expected to expand in Duval, Clay and Nassau counties, as the leaders of 22 agencies, including law enforcement, child services and the judicial system, signed on to an agreement for new rules.