Does Lexington have a gang problem? New study plans to find out.

November 13, 2018. Lexington Herald Leader.

The city of Lexington took its first step Tuesday toward hiring a group from New York to analyze crime data for the past five years to determine if Lexington has a problem with crimes committed by groups and gangs.

The Lexington-Fayette Urban County Council voting unanimously during a Tuesday work session to approve a $35,000 contract with John Jay College for Criminal Justice’s National Network for Safe Communities. A final vote is expected in December.

An interfaith coalition of leaders has pressed Mayor Jim Gray, police and other city leaders for four years to implement the National Network for Safe Communities model, which uses direct intervention methods in neighborhoods to address group crime activity.

City officials to give updates on addiction, public safety at CLOUT meeting

November 12, 2018. Insider Louisville.

Several city officials are slated to provide updates Monday on a wide range of topics — from school safety to how the police treat individuals with mental illness — that have been raised by one of Louisville’s most prominent interfaith social justice organizations.

On Monday night, members of CLOUT, or Citizens of Louisville Organized and United Together, will hear “progress reports” from several local politicians about targeted “issue campaigns” undertaken by the group, according to a news release.

Three finalists to conduct racial bias audit of CPD will present to city on Monday

September 20, 2018. Charleston City Paper.

A 15-person committee will hear presentations from three firms interested in conducting a racial bias study of the Charleston Police Department Monday afternoon.

The firms were narrowed down from a list of seven that submitted application to the city’s Procurement Division for a chance at the controversial contract.

Mayor, CLOUT in apparent deadlock over police de-escalation training

August 14, 2018. Insider Louisville.

Following a contentious meeting and an official rebuff from the mayor’s office, the leadership of Citizens of Louisville Organized and United Together said the group wants to meet with Mayor Greg Fischer again to hash out unfinished business over the way police handle use-of-force cases involving at-risk individuals.

At a June 22 meeting with the mayor, his staff and Louisville Metro Police Department Chief Steve Conrad, CLOUT called on the city to create an independent body to review 68 cases it said revealed a lack of consideration for de-escalation training for LMPD officers who have used force against mentally ill or drug-addicted individuals.

Mayor Fischer Won’t Meet Again With Citizen Group To Talk Louisville Police Policies

August 10, 2018. WFPL.

Mayor Greg Fischer’s office has denied a follow-up meeting with a local faith-based group addressing police de-escalation tactics, saying there’s “no need” for a meeting with the mayor or his deputy.

Citizens of Louisville Organized and United Together (CLOUT) met with Mayor Fischer on June 22, alleging the Louisville Metro Police Department doesn’t enforce it’s own de-escalation policies when it interacts with mentally disabled and addicted people.