CAJM Moving Past Its Successes Onto Affordable Housing In 2018

February 16, 2018. The Charleston Chronicle. 

Charleston Area Justice Ministry President Rev. Charles Heyward thinks the network of faith-based congregations ended 2017 on a high note, though there were some disappointments. Currently some 28 congregations are members of the organization formed in 2011 to address social justice issues. Its first initiative in 2012 was to address Schools/Education and Crime/Violence.  Each year since CAJM successfully has challenged issues that include wage inequity and police bias. Last November members voted to address affordable housing and gentrification in 2018.

BREAD plans annual community activism event

April 28, 2017. The Columbus Dispatch.

More than 2,000 people will flow into the Celeste Center at the Ohio State Fairgrounds on Monday evening for BREAD’s annual Nehemiah Action event. Afterward, Cathy Levine hopes they leave feeling the power they have to accomplish “wonderful things” in the community.

Levine, a committee chairwoman with the interfaith group BREAD — Building Responsibility, Equality And Dignity — and other group officials are hosting the event at 7 p.m. Monday.

JUMP Topeka ‘Night of Justice’ sees official commit to tackle mental health, housing and transportation issues

April 25, 2017. The Topeka Capital-Journal.

A boisterous crowd in downtown Topeka’s Grace Episcopal Cathedral gave booming cheers as Topeka and Shawnee County officials agreed to tackle mental health, affordable housing and transportation — issues affecting many disenfranchised Topekans.

Topeka Justice Unity Ministry Project, more commonly called JUMP, brought members of 20 Shawnee County churches together for a “Night of Justice,” where officials, including Mayor Larry Wolgast, agreed to explore:

RISC to address reading, childhood trauma, job training at assembly

April 21, 2017. Henrico Citizen.

On May 1, more than 1,700 community members representing Richmonders Involved to Strengthen our Communities will gather at St. Paul’s Baptist Church (4247 Creighton Road) at 7 p.m. to address elementary reading, childhood trauma and job training in the greater Richmond region. Community members will speak about each issue and proposed solution.

To Fill Medical Jobs, Richmond Looks to Poorest Communities

November 16, 2016. Next City.

In Richmond, Virginia, hospitals are facing a shortage of entry-level workers that medical training programs are unable to assign. An estimated 500 entry-level medical jobs go unfilled across the region every year, as medical programs at schools like J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College report that 881 students dropped out of its ranks in the fall of 2015.

So this year, organizers with Richmonders Involved to Strengthen our Communities (RISC) decided to do something about it. They’re rolling out a new six-partner job pipeline network with Richmond-area hospital systems like Hospital Corporation of America (HCA) Virginia Health System and Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) Health System to get a larger chunk of the city’s 28,000 unemployed workers into one of the state’s growth industries.