Social justice group to focus on senior abuse in nursing homes

April 1, 2019. The Sun Sentinel.

They work behind the scenes trying to fix what’s wrong in the community.

They are BOLD Justice, or Broward Organized Leaders Doing Justice, an interfaith organization comprised of 23 congregations throughout Broward County.

The group is hosting a free event April 8 expected to draw more than 1,200 people, including Broward Sheriff Gregory Tony.

Advocates Ask Metro Council To Protect City Funding For ‘The Living Room’

March 27, 2019. 89.3 WFPL.

Centerstone’s The Living Room program helps people with mental health and substance abuse issues avoid jail. But looming city budget cuts could threaten the program’s future less than two years after it opened.

Mayor Greg Fischer’s office has projected a $65 million budget shortfall by 2023 due largely to rising employee pension costs. In order to fill the gap, Fischer proposed tripling the insurance premium tax. A council committee approved a compromise measure — gradually doubling the insurance premium tax from 5 percent to 10 percent on lines other than auto and health, and $15 million in city budget cuts. But Metro Council voted down the plan and now they will move forward to cut $35 million from the upcoming year’s budget that begins July 1.

City officials to give updates on addiction, public safety at CLOUT meeting

November 12, 2018. Insider Louisville.

Several city officials are slated to provide updates Monday on a wide range of topics — from school safety to how the police treat individuals with mental illness — that have been raised by one of Louisville’s most prominent interfaith social justice organizations.

On Monday night, members of CLOUT, or Citizens of Louisville Organized and United Together, will hear “progress reports” from several local politicians about targeted “issue campaigns” undertaken by the group, according to a news release.

Editorial: Best decision on mental health

August 19, 2018. Lawrence Journal-World.

The Douglas County Commission made the right decision in choosing to seek a quarter-cent sales tax increase to fund the construction and operation of a mental health campus.

The county’s other options included a half-cent sales tax increase and a combination of sales and property taxes. The quarter-cent sales tax gives the mental health campus the best chance of success.

The mental health campus includes plans for a 20,000-square-foot crisis center with sobering and detoxification units, transitional housing for those with behavioral health issues and funding for new mental health services.

Douglas County to put quarter-cent sales tax for behavioral health projects on November ballot

August 15, 2018. Lawrence Journal-World.

The Douglas County Commission agreed Wednesday to ask voters to approve a quarter-cent sales tax to build a behavioral health campus and fund enhanced mental health and substance abuse programming.

If approved by voters in November, the quarter-cent sales tax will raise an estimated $4.9 million annually. That is $885,000 less than the amount needed to build the campus and fund the programming envisioned in Proposition 1, a ballot question county voters rejected in May.