‘Safe City’ meeting calls for drug, housing, school reform

March 28, 2017. The Louisville Courier-Journal.

The “Safe City” platform of Citizens of Louisville Organized and United Together, or “CLOUT” was on the table Tuesday in a gathering of hundreds of residents, elected officials, civic leaders and activists at the Memorial Auditorium in Old Louisville.

Representatives from 22 churches and religious organizations led a conversation with officials about the agenda of affordable housing, education reform, substance abuse and mental health treatment.

IMPACT updated on women’s treatment facility, senior housing initiatives

March 28, 2017. The Daily Progress.

Hundreds of people from diverse religious backgrounds came together on Tuesday night for updates on two initiatives taken up by the Interfaith Movement Promoting Action by Congregations Together, better known as IMPACT.

With 16 congregations — some Christian, some Jewish, some Muslim — in attendance Tuesday night at the Church of the Incarnation, committee leader Janie Pudhorodsky reminded the crowd that the local regional jail locks up about 3,150 drug and alcohol addicts each year and said that nearly all female inmates have experienced sexual abuse and violence.

Douglas County Commission hears but doesn’t commit to Justice Matters’ request for interim mental health crisis intervention center

March 15, 2017. Lawrence Journal-World.

The Douglas County Commission received but didn’t commit to a request from interfaith group Justice Matters to renovate an existing building for use as a mental health crisis intervention center that could be opened this year.

CLOUT unveils Safe City platform for Louisville

March 7, 2017. WLKY.com

LOUISVILLE, KY — The group CLOUT, or Citizens of Louisville Organized and United Together, on Tuesday unveiled its Safe City platform, which targets crime, drug addiction, housing instability and school suspensions in Louisville.The faith-based organization is calling for improved training and accountability for police officers and others in the criminal justice system who deal with addicts and people who are mentally ill.

Lawrence faith leaders push for crisis center over jail expansion

November 1, 2016. KSHB 41.

LAWRENCE, Kan. – While Douglas County considers a $30 million proposal that would expand its jail, a large group of faith leaders are pushing for what they believe is an alternative approach that would dramatically cut down on arrests.

“Put fewer people in jail and provide good mental healthcare for those who need it,” said Joanna Harader, pastor of Peace Mennonite Church in Lawrence and spokesperson for Justice Matters.