Thousands demand end to ‘school-to-prison’ pipeline

May 1, 2017. WCMH-TV Columbus.

COLUMBUS (WCMH) — 26,000. That’s the number of suspensions given out just last year alone in the Columbus Public School District, according to the Ohio Department of Education. Monday night thousands met in Columbus to demand an end to what they call the school-to-prison pipeline.

Of the 26,000 suspensions, we don’t know how many are from the same student. Still, it’s a shocking number. The B.R.E.A.D. Organization said it’s too many and that students who get suspended are more likely to fail, drop out and end up in prison.

BREAD plans annual community activism event

April 28, 2017. The Columbus Dispatch.

More than 2,000 people will flow into the Celeste Center at the Ohio State Fairgrounds on Monday evening for BREAD’s annual Nehemiah Action event. Afterward, Cathy Levine hopes they leave feeling the power they have to accomplish “wonderful things” in the community.

Levine, a committee chairwoman with the interfaith group BREAD — Building Responsibility, Equality And Dignity — and other group officials are hosting the event at 7 p.m. Monday.

CAJM calls on city officials to address transparency, policing reform at Nehemiah Action Assembly

April 25, 2017. Charleston City Paper.

Charleston Area Justice Ministry doubled down on calls for policing reform during the multi-denominational coalition’s annual Nehemiah Action Assembly. A confrontational exercise by design, this year’s meeting saw five Charleston City Councilmen vow their support for more transparency regarding police stops and bringing in a firm specializing in racial bias to examine the Charleston Police Department.

Charleston Area Justice Ministry again tackles police pretext stops at Nehemiah Action Assembly

April 24, 2017. The Post and Courier.

The Charleston Area Justice Ministry got most of the answers that it was looking for from elected officials on Monday.

One North Charleston City councilman, five Charleston City councilmen and five Charleston County School Board members took the stage at Justice Ministry’s fifth annual Nehemiah Action Assembly to answer questions in front of a crowd of nearly 2,000 at Mount Moriah Baptist Church. 

Lexington should try anti-violence strategies working in other cities

April 21, 2017. Lexington Herald-Leader.

No one in Lexington should have to worry, like Cheryl Birch does, as she leaves before dawn for her job at a local hospital, “Am I going to step out into gunfire, step on somebody.”

Mayor Jim Gray has made reducing gun violence, especially to protect Lexington’s youth, a priority and is asking the council to approve funding for 30 new police officers.

But more police doing the same things won’t produce different results.