Fischer To Meet With Group Critical Of LMPD Crisis Policies

June 22, 2018. WFPL.

The head of a Louisville faith-based group and the mayor will meet Friday to discuss safer policing months after multiple requests for the mayor to meet.

Citizens of Louisville Organized and United Together (CLOUT) Co-President Reginald Barnes said the goal of the meeting is to prompt an external review of Louisville Metro Police Department policies. Barnes said better policing techniques could help keep citizens and officers safe, and prevent police shootings, like that of Darnell Wicker in 2016.

School system ratchets up trauma training

June 13, 2018. Chesterfield Observer.

Chesterfield school officials have committed publicly to expanding trauma-informed care training for staff as part of a “cultural shift” they think will reduce office referrals and out-of-school suspensions and keep children in the classroom.

Now they have to figure out how to pay for it.

These are the 7 firms the city is considering for a racial bias study of the Charleston Police Department

May 31, 2018. Charleston City Paper.

The city of Charleston is forging ahead with a planned study of the the city’s policing tactics and whether or not they disproportionally affect African-American and minority citizens.

So far, eight consulting firms have responded to a request for proposal published by the city on May 1, according to city spokesperson Chloe Field. One of them, the Maryland-based firm Cook Ross, submitted a courtesy letter stating they were not interested in the contract.

At forum, public demands separate ballot question for behavioral health campus, services

May 30, 2018. Lawrence Journal-World.

At a public forum Wednesday, voters asked county leaders to end any plans to expand the county jail, as well as to pose a new ballot question that would only fund mental health and substance abuse needs.

The forum drew about 500 people Wednesday evening to Building 21 at the Douglas County Fairgrounds. County commissioners scheduled it earlier this month after voters defeated Proposition 1, which, if it had passed, would have authorized a countywide half-cent sales tax to fund a $44 million jail expansion, an $11 million behavioral health campus and $5.1 million in additional behavioral health services.