Louisville police need to stop shooting the mentally ill and drug addicted, CLOUT says

April 19, 2018. Courier Journal.

Mayor Greg Fischer needs to do more to ensure Louisville police officers will avoid using deadly force when dealing with people coping with drug addiction or suffering from mental illness, a faith-based group said.

Citizens of Louisville Organized and United Together, or CLOUT, dropped off about 600 postcards signed by its members at Fischer’s office Thursday over the department’s de-escalation tactics, which the group said will protect law enforcement and vulnerable residents alike.

“We have many loved ones and friends in our congregations with mental illnesses and addictions who live in fear of potential encounters with the police,” said the Rev. Reginald Barnes, pastor of Brown Memorial C.M.E. Church, a co-president of CLOUT.

CLOUT urges Mayor Fischer to discuss police shootings

April 19, 2018. WHAS 11.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WHAS11) — Members of the clergy are calling on Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer to have a dialogue about police shootings.

The group Citizens of Louisville Organized and United Together, or CLOUT, brought 600 cards to the mayor’s office which were signed by citizens asking him to meet with the organization.

Still hope in Lee County for money to help provide children’s programs

April 19, 2018. New-Press.com

Leaders of a movement to bring a Children’s Services Council to Lee County took a hit Tuesday when a motion by Lee County Commissioner Frank Mann to create language for a referendum to bring the issue to voters died for a lack of a second commissioner vote.

The movement, by a group called Pennies For Community Progress, has picked up considerable momentum and support the last two years from business, community and religious groups. They saw the need to fund critical early child hood learning, after school and health care programs that are underfunded. 

PEACE calls for community IDs, slams commissioners who skipped meeting

April 18, 2018. Palm Beach Post.

More than 2,000 people attended a community meeting at the Palm Beach County Convention Center Monday evening, but organizers were miffed that figure wasn’t a little larger.

Officials from the social activism group People Engaged in Active Community Efforts called out six of the county’s seven commissioners for skipping the gathering, saying the commissioners’ absences underscored the county’s lack of progress in addressing homelessness and the creation of a community identification card that could be used by immigrants who don’t have a government-issued one.

“Are you disappointed that six of our seven county commissioners did not see fit to meet with well over 2,000 of their constituents?” Jason Fairbanks, pastor of the First Congregational United Church of Christ, asked audience members. “Our community needs to know who stood with us and who did not.”

City leaders commit to critical problem solutions

April 17, 2018. WHAS 11.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WHAS11) – It was a crowded auditorium Tuesday night, as hundreds from the organization, CLOUT, offered their solutions for some of Louisville Metro’s most critical problems: affordable housing, mental illness and school safety.

CLOUT, the Citizens of Louisville Organized and United Together asked city leaders like JCPS Superintendent Dr. Marty Pollio to commit to putting restorative practices in 10 more schools by the 2019-20 school year.