Can ‘restorative practices’ in schools get at the root of bad behavior? The idea is being tested

April 19, 2018. The Post and Courier.

The two boys were play-fighting, until suddenly they weren’t. The slap rang out at Northwoods Middle School.

Students at Northwoods are bound by the same rules and consequences as anyone else in the Charleston County School District. But thanks to a pilot program that started at their school and four others last year, the students also have a unique opportunity to face one another and make amends for their mistakes.

The pilot program is known as “restorative practices,” an approach to resolving conflicts that emphasizes personal responsibility and healing relationships. The approach was developed by Australian police to work with juvenile offenders in the 1990s, and it has since spread to schools worldwide.

PEACE calls for community IDs, slams commissioners who skipped meeting

April 18, 2018. Palm Beach Post.

More than 2,000 people attended a community meeting at the Palm Beach County Convention Center Monday evening, but organizers were miffed that figure wasn’t a little larger.

Officials from the social activism group People Engaged in Active Community Efforts called out six of the county’s seven commissioners for skipping the gathering, saying the commissioners’ absences underscored the county’s lack of progress in addressing homelessness and the creation of a community identification card that could be used by immigrants who don’t have a government-issued one.

“Are you disappointed that six of our seven county commissioners did not see fit to meet with well over 2,000 of their constituents?” Jason Fairbanks, pastor of the First Congregational United Church of Christ, asked audience members. “Our community needs to know who stood with us and who did not.”

City leaders commit to critical problem solutions

April 17, 2018. WHAS 11.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WHAS11) – It was a crowded auditorium Tuesday night, as hundreds from the organization, CLOUT, offered their solutions for some of Louisville Metro’s most critical problems: affordable housing, mental illness and school safety.

CLOUT, the Citizens of Louisville Organized and United Together asked city leaders like JCPS Superintendent Dr. Marty Pollio to commit to putting restorative practices in 10 more schools by the 2019-20 school year.

Interfaith Group Gets Commitments On Affordable Housing, Civil Citations

April 17, 2018. WUSF News.

Elected leaders in Hillsborough County were in the hot seat Monday night, asked to commit on the spot to action on community issues.

More than 1,000 members of the interfaith group Hillsborough Organization for Progress and Equality (HOPE) asked officials for commitments on expanding the civil citation program, creating a local affordable housing trust fund and increased funding for elder care services. The event was part of the groups 2018 Nehemiah Action.

When asked, Hillsborough public defender Julianne Holt, Chief Judge Ronald Ficarrotta and State Attorney Andrew Warren said they will support extending the county’s civil citation program to include second and third misdemeanor offenses by minors.

C.A.J.E. holds annual rally in Newburgh

April 16, 2018. Tristate homepage.com

C.A.J.E.. which stands for Congregations Acting for Justice and Empowerment had their yearly meeting in Newburgh.

It’s been almost a year since C.A.J.E. held its Nehemiah action meeting, where goals and solutions are made for the year ahead.

So what has been accomplished? First, Narcan.

C.A.J.E. co-chair Richard Gregg says the group got local police and sheriff departments and EMT’s to carry Narcan.