Firm seeks community’s input for racial bias in Charleston Police Department

February 7, 2019. The Post and Courier.

Inside a meeting hall at Ebenezer AME Church on Charleston’s East Side Thursday night, Fouche Sheppard shared a story of how she was pulled over by a police officer she believed had profiled her.

The officer told her he thought she was an African American male before letting her go, she said.

Sheppard’s story was one of a handful shared during the first town hall meeting held as part of an eight-month, $158,556 racial bias audit of the Charleston Police Department by the Virginia-based firm CNA. Although small in attendance, a number of residents from the East Side neighborhood shared personal stories, suggestions on ways to increase community collaboration with police and asked questions about how a police department that seems to have drifted away from true, community-level policing can begin to right the course. 

Housing prices still unaffordable for most in Charleston region, burdening workforce

January 26, 2019. The Post and Courier.

Even as more people over the past year have called for action on the affordable housing shortage in the Charleston region, typical rents and home prices remain higher than what most workers can pay.

In late 2017, The Post and Courier analyzed local housing trends and salary data, revealing that much of the workforce couldn’t afford to live where they worked in the center of the region. As a result, teachers, police officers and hospitality workers were moving farther away into the edges of town for cheaper housing — adding more commuters to an already congested roads system.

Charleston 2019 Budget Should Include $15 Per Hour Minimum Wage, Workers Insist

December 5, 2018. The Charleston Chronicle.

Charleston City Council’s regularly scheduled December 4 meeting appeared almost a feeding frenzy as Mayor John Tecklenburg and councilmembers discussed the city’s 2019 annual budget. The mayor is proposing a nearly $223 million operating budget and several entities seeking municipal funding are in line for a share. They include a group that wants the city to increase the minimum wage for its employees to $15 per hour.

Transportation will take top priority for Charleston Area Justice Ministry in 2019


November 7, 2018. Charleston City Paper.

The Charleston Area Justice Ministry will focus its time, resources, and people power on improving transportation in the Lowcountry in 2019.

The perceived lack of accessible public transit came out on top with 221 votes at Monday night’s Community Problems Assembly at Morris Brown AME in downtown Charleston.

Education got second place, with 132 votes. Crime and violence trailed behind with 84 votes.