20 more JCPS schools to train in restorative practices for student behavior

November 25, 2019. The Courier-Journal.

Jefferson County Public Schools will expand its restorative practice efforts to another 20 schools before the start of the 2020-21 school year, the district announced Monday. 

Teachers and administrators at about 30 JCPS schools have been trained in restorative practices — a research-backed method to improve behavior and increase student belonging and relationships.

CLOUT, a social justice-centered organization, has pushed JCPS to implement restorative practices for a decade. Superintendent Marty Pollio promised the group that the district will have restorative practices in all 155 schools within six years. 

Parents push Pinellas Schools to speed up ‘restorative practices’

November 12, 2019. WTSP.COM

PINELLAS COUNTY, Fla. — A grassroots group of concerned parents, grandparents and career educators stood in support of one another at Tuesday’s Pinellas County School Board meeting. Each of them are members of F.A.S.T. (Faith and Action for Strength Together) and came to voice concerns over the school district’s implementation of, what is known as, “restorative practices.”

It’s the social science that studies how to strengthen relationships between individuals and social connections within communities, according to the International Institute for Restorative Practices.

The IIRP says, in schools that fully implement restorative practices, student arrest and suspension — and overall racial disparities in discipline — go down. Restorative practices are also said to increase a feeling of safety among teachers and reduce teacher turnover.

Hundreds attend Charleston Area Justice Ministry assembly to discuss community problems

November 5, 2019. CountOnNews2.

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD)- Hundreds of community members attend the Charleston Area Justice Ministry’s 2019 Community Problems assembly to discuss issues in the Charleston area.

CAJM is a faith-based organization comprised of many different Christian, Jewish, and Unitarian members. Their mission is to “come together to make the Charleston area a more just place to live, work, and do business.”

Tonight’s assembly addressed four different areas in the community that CAJM feels need attention: Education, Policing, Housing and Transportation.

CLOUT hears progress reports from top public officials at Community Problems Assembly

October 29, 2019. WLKY.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Hundreds of leaders from around the community gathered to hear from top city officials on the progress being made around four key issues.

Citizens of Louisville Organized and United Together, or CLOUT, first met in March when officials committed to changes in schools, housing, addiction treatment and care for seniors.

The Louisville Metro Police Department Chief Steve Conrad spoke Tuesday about his department’s deescalation procedures.

School suspensions tied to increase in assaults, theft, drug crimes, Kentucky researchers say

July 18, 2019. Lexington Herald Leader.

Two researchers from Kentucky have co-authored a new study that shows that school suspensions increased criminal behaviors among teens that include assault, stealing, and selling drugs.

The study, by former Elizabethtown resident Thomas James Mowen, now a researcher at Ohio’s Bowling Green State University and John J. Brent, an assistant professor at Eastern Kentucky University, was published July 12 in Justice Quarterly, a publication of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences. It has received national media attention this week.

“The effect of school discipline aren’t as short-lived as some people think,” Brent told the Herald-Leader Wednesday. “It can create a ripple effect that impacts youth as they move into and enter adulthood.”