Annual Topeka JUMP meeting focuses on housing and transportation

April 30, 2018. The Topeka Capital-Journal.

About 1,000 people listened intently to a message of justice Monday evening as the Topeka Justice Unity and Ministry Project held its fifth annual meeting to talk about problems the city’s residents face.

The meeting was held at Most Pure Heart of Mary Catholic Church, where members of 19 congregations listened to how city officials planned to work on safe and affordable housing and public transportation, the meeting’s two topics.

Topeka JUMP to meet Monday to voice support for affordable housing fund

April 29, 2018. The Topeka Capital-Journal.

A coalition of Shawnee County churches will gather Monday to advocate for an affordable housing trust fund, a concept they have worked on for two years.

Topeka JUMP, which is comprised of 20 churches, will present a proposal to establish the fund using private and public dollars. It prioritizes the creation and preservation of affordable housing, lead organizer Shanae Holman said in a news release.

Five City Council members set to attend activist gathering calling for affordable housing

April 25, 2018. Charleston City Paper.

At least eight area leaders, including five from Charleston City Council, have agreed to attend a local activist group’s gathering to discuss possible solutions to the city’s affordable housing crisis on Monday night.

A conversation on rising rent costs will be followed by a question-and-answer session with officials from the city of Charleston, the county, and neighboring municipalities at the Charleston Area Justice Ministry’s “Nehemiah Action.”

Faith Community Asks City, County Leaders to Tackle Affordable Housing Crisis

April 24, 2018. NBC 29.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (WVIR) – The faith community is coming together to tackle the affordable housing crisis in Charlottesville and Albemarle County. On Tuesday, April 24, hundreds gathered as part of the action assembly held by Interfaith Movement Promoting Action by Congregations Together (IMPACT). 

City leaders commit to critical problem solutions

April 17, 2018. WHAS 11.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WHAS11) – It was a crowded auditorium Tuesday night, as hundreds from the organization, CLOUT, offered their solutions for some of Louisville Metro’s most critical problems: affordable housing, mental illness and school safety.

CLOUT, the Citizens of Louisville Organized and United Together asked city leaders like JCPS Superintendent Dr. Marty Pollio to commit to putting restorative practices in 10 more schools by the 2019-20 school year.