Lexington B.U.I.L.D. Group Gets City Backing on Violence Reduction Initiative

May 14, 2018. WEKU.

An effort to develop a strategy to reduce group related violence is expected to start this summer in Lexington.

Many members of a large-multi faith organization in the city heard what they wanted to hear during an annual assembly last week.

Representatives of B.U.I.L.D., or Building a United Interfaith Lexington through Direct Action, have had success in convincing government leaders to move forward with their researched initiatives.

Faith community calls on Lexington mayor to work with anti-violence group

May 10, 2018. WKYT.

LEXINGTON, Ky. (WKYT) – They’re issues that hit close to home for many people: drugs, violent crime, and mental health care.

On Thursday, thousands of people gathered in Lexington to discuss these issues and possible solutions to them at Building a United Interfaith Lexington through Direct-Action’s (BUILD) annual Nehemiah Action Assembly.

‘Not safe in my own home.’ Thousands call for solutions to violence in Lexington

May 10, 2018. Lexington Herald Leader.

Deloris Lee has lived in a home off Lexington’s Russell Cave Road for more than 40 years, and she used to feel safe there. But in June, the home where she raised her children was riddled with bullet holes.

Lee was out of town for Father’s Day on the night of the shooting, but she said she feels she would not be alive had she been home.

Lee told a crowd of about 2,000 Thursday night at B.U.I.L.D.’s 18th annual Nehemiah Action Assembly that she ducked when walking past windows in her own home for weeks after the shooting, which left bullet holes in her doors, walls, curtains and in the clothes in an upstairs closet.

Here’s a movement to stop gun violence in our own backyard

March 16, 2018. The Miami Herald.

The issue of guns has filled our thoughts, prayers, conversations, and debates.

With over 680 people shot in Miami-Dade in 2016 and the unwavering average of 200 people shot and killed each year since 2011 in our community, there is a crisis that begs for intervention.

A year ago, members from People Acting for Community Together (PACT) asked the Miami-Dade, Miami and Miami Gardens police to seriously research three gun violence intervention program and choose one for implementation.

We are proud of our police departments for doing just that. They chose: John Jay College’s Group Violence Intervention program (GVI).

Offenders told they still have a chance to change as part of plan to end killings

November 11, 2017. The Columbus Dispatch.

“You’ve got to pay attention to this. You’ve got to be awake for this,” Fred Benton, a defense attorney, told them. “The law is looking for you.”

A group of 16 people saw the Franklin County Common Pleas courtroom from a unique vantage point Thursday.

Each is on probation for violent or gun-related crimes. About half have affiliations to criminal street gangs. Many knew someone who had been shot and, in some cases, killed.

The two women and 14 men of varying age and race and from various parts of the city sat in the jury box with a different fate to weigh — their own. Each still has a chance.